Minnie Ingersoll

Minnie Ingersoll

Partner

Minnie is a long-time Silicon Valley product and operations executive with experience building and scaling impact through elegant technical solutions and great teams. She recently moved back to LA after 20+ years in the Bay Area and is excited to be a part of the growing tech ecosystem of Southern California. Minnie started her career as an early product manager at Google. After 11+ years, she left Google to begin her own entrepreneurial journey as the co-founder and COO of Shift, an online marketplace for used cars. In her spare time, she hosts the LA Venture podcast!

Hometown + Education

Grew up in Pasadena

Stanford Computer Science

Before TenOneTen

Founder of Shift.com

Early product manager at Google

Weirdest moment of your early stage startup

Our first warehouse had pigeons over where we parked the cars. We spent time brainstorming pigeon poison, bb guns, or getting a hawk.

Best thing about being a founder?

I still get really excited whenever I see a Shift car on the road.

Hardest thing about being a founder?

I thought I was a reasonably good communicator... until I had a large diverse team to manage.

What areas are you focused on as an investor?

Legacy industry SAAS, logistics, climate tech and some other things.

What brought you to LA

I moved back from the Bay Area to live with my parents in the house that I grew up in.

 

Nerdiest thing about you?

The house I grew up in was called the Commune for Hardworking Scientists.

Best advice you’ve gotten?

Show up, tell the truth, hope for the best. 

Early lesson you learned about investing?

Take the fund size and divide by 50 and that's the size check they want to write.

How do you spend time outside of work?

Raising baby people and surfing baby waves.

Most “LA” thing about you?

I've skied and surfed on the same day.

Lessons on mentorship?

Don’t underestimate the effect you can have on someone’s career with small acts of kindness.

Anything else?

I'd love to meet more founders working on climate tech and economic opportunity.